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The Long, Lost Exit Home

The Long, Lost Exit Home

Also lost: the art of comma usage.

Comments

  1. At least 6 different fonts, and a fake light sparkle on the razor blade, the distorted eye image — the horror is all there in the cover design.

    1. Nice reference. It is literally the first thing in months that I’ve seen that makes me feel smart. I appreciate it.

  2. Has anyone here read the book? I have, and really enjoyed it. There is a reason for everything and I think the cover is awesome. Supposed to be blurred because of where the picture takes place. Typo? Where…The sentence is correct: The Long, Lost Exit Home. Also, the title makes sense once again if you read the book. I just don’t think you have anything better to do with your time then pick on hard working indie authors that do their very best. Everything on the cover has meaning. How boring it would be with all the same font, yuck!

    1. All the same dumb arguments from someone who mistakenly thinks she’s smart.

      Supposed to be blurred because of where the picture takes place.

      Which would be fine, except people see the cover BEFORE they read the book — and if it looks amateurish, they don’t pick it up.

      Typo? Where…

      You mean, aside from your own ignorant misuse of punctuation? Right here: “The sea will unleash nightmares, That will come to feast!” Even if you want to argue (wrongly) in favor of the capital T on “That,” there’s no way that that comma belongs there.

      The title makes sense once would read the book.

      Then put the title on the last page of the book, NOT ON THE COVER.

      I just don’t think you have anything better to do with your time then pick on hard working indie authors that do their very best.

      You go after us for not knowing anything about the book, then make judgments about us as people? Our professional credits are all on record all over this site. And you’re moving the goalposts — you can’t simultaneously argue “There’s nothing wrong with this cover!” AND “Don’t be critical, the author was trying his best!” There are plenty of indie authors who’s work doesn’t need special pleading to seem competent.

      How boring it would be with all the same font, yuck!

      You mean, like professionally presented books that actually make their authors money? Yeah, that’s gotta be hard.

      Seriously, if I were the author I’d be embarrassed to have a friend like this think she’s helping.

      1. Oh well, I guess it’s just more opinion. Poems mostly always have a capital on the first line of the sentence.

        What about your book cover, “LEVELS” I personally don’t like it because is looks like a dark toilet bowl? So… it’s all a matter of opinion. I don’t like picking on anybody, but I will bite back. There will always be something that somebody does not like about something! So I leave this conversation and get back to more important things like my family and work.

    2. > How boring it would be with all the same font, yuck!

      I agree, but “Home” should be in a cross-stitch sampler font.

      > Everything on the cover has meaning.

      That “When night falls…” verse really needs “Burma Shave” after it.

    3. No, we have not read the book, nor are we going to. The cover is meant to entice a reader to pick up the book and read it – not as something you look at afterwards and go AAAH, now I know why the cover had to have such an amateurish photo on it!

      This does not make me, and I doubt anyone else, want to read it. Even if they may winder at the Long Exit.

  3. Yes, it would have been cool with a cross-stitch sampler font for “Home”. I am not a writer, so what does a “Burma Shave” mean?

    1. From 1920 to 1963 Burma-Shave posted advertising signs along highways each with one line of a jingle, ending with “Burma-Shave”.

    2. Despite the illustration, the cover has a sort of playful air to it. The title treatment suggests an element of humor or parody to the book, and the verse is much like the old Burma Shave jingles–I thought that might have been done intentionally as a play on the illustration. (Burma Shave was a brand of shaving cream.)

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